Hello, I’m Sean.

I’m a veteran designer & design leader.

↓ Learn more or ↓↓ Contact me

I am currently the Design Lead for Passbook by Remitly, a mobile bank account for immigrants.

An iPhone showing a banking app with a premium looking debit card positioned next to it

Passbook includes the first physical Remitly product. I designed the card to affirm origins while conveying status and a premium quality.

A screenshot of the welcome screen for PassbookA screenshot of the identity verification screen of the signup flow for PassbookA screenshot of the initial state of the Home Screen for PassbookA screenshot of the card info screen in PassbookA screenshot of the transfer confirmation and authorization screen in PassbookA screenshot of the transfer success screen in PassbookA screenshot of the Home Screen in Passbook, showing a list of transactionsA screenshot of the "invite a friend" screen in Passbook

I designed the Passbook UI to strike a balance between utility and friendliness with a modern, approachable style. The UX and supporting design system adhere to established design patterns.

An ad for Passbook showing a table of fees with all of them being $0, with a headline which says "F(r)ee table"An ad for Passbook which shows the Passbook debit card with a headline which says "No fees" with an asterisk. The asterisk disclaimer says "No, really. No fees"An ad for Passbook which shows two app icons: one is the Messages app with a notification badge with the number 3. The other is the Passbook app icon with a notification badge with a dollar sign symbol.An ad for Passbook showing three different Passbook cards falling through the air, each with a different country flag and name on it

We learned the premium side of our aesthetic resonates well for marketing, so art direction for Passbook orbits around the theme of access to status, prestige, and high quality.

In 2011, I co-founded Tagboard, a social media presentation platform. My role began as designer and quickly shifted to company and product leadership.

An arrangement of different Tagboard logos set on different colorsA laptop showing an old version of the Tagboard website with a big, clear search bar on it which reads, "Start by searching any #hashtag"

I designed Tagboard’s brand and visual identity with trends in mind, but also so it could stand the test of time. The brand mark itself integrates the hash symbol (#) and a lowercase T.

A diagram showing various stages of the design process for early versions of Tagboard

Initially, my work spanned from concept through to final execution, including development of the product prototype we used to raise investment capital.

A photo of exotic Audi cars at an auto show with a large, landscape display hanging overhead. On the display is a social media post.A photo of a crowd of people in a stadium with a large screen above them showing a social media post.

Tagboard became an essential part of the social media ecosystem, providing a safe and easy way for organizations to display user-generated content in branded experiences, both digitally and in real-world venues.

Later, I would begin designing through people, as I helped support thousands of little decisions — about typography, layout, timing, color, hierarchy — which went into social media displays, seen by millions of people.

A photo of a group of people standing outside with jackets on, posing as if they were in a music band

My greatest accomplishment during my time at Tagboard was leading this team of amazing folks to design, build, and deliver an award-winning enterprise platform to generate millions in revenue. (This was a staged “band shot”. They were so accommodating of me.)

For a few years, I was the Principal Designer at a small app development studio I co-founded. We made single-use utility apps for iOS.

An iPhone showing a video camera app along with the app's icon — which looks like a record button — set outside the iPhone

Capture solved the problem of missing a special moment because the video camera took too long to launch. I designed the icon to mimic a physical record button, and the UI to do its job and stay out of the way.

Screenshots of an iPhone app showing various stages of creating a text message template.

Canned was a way to create reusable templates for text messages. We used mostly system UI, but I designed a custom control and UX for adding a specific recipient.

An iPhone laying on its back showing an app with a card-like interface for a tweet.The Twitter icon alongside a yellow icon with a white star on it, two of the arms of the star look like bird wings.

Quality social media was being drowned out by noise, so Starbird was a way to follow people’s favorites instead of their tweets. I designed a fullscreen card interface and horizontal swipe interaction experience.

Earlier, I led digital media production at The City Church, a large church with multiple campuses.

Multiple diverse websites arranged in a fanned pattern.

I designed, built, and maintained dozens of websites for the church's ministries and campaigns.

A book and CD coverVarious graphic compositions with different sermon series titles

I was responsible for creative and art direction for book and CD covers, as well as for events and sermon series.

Various photos of real billboards with the "JESUS IS ___" graphic on them

I helped design a campaign to invite an open conversation about Jesus, the most controversial figure in history.

A screenshot of the home page of the Jesus Is websiteA screenshot of one of the user-created tiles from the Jesus Is websiteA screenshot of the submission interface for the Jesus Is website

The web-app I built let visitors anonymously fill in the blank, share their answer, view others’ answers (once they'd been curated), and agree/disagree with them.

As a design generalist, my skills are valuable for any company and indispensable for early-stage projects.

Email me

sean@sperte.com

Connect with me

/sperte

Follow me

@sperte

It's pronounced “spur-tee” ☺︎